Follow

Keep in contact through the following social networks or via RSS feed:

  • Follow on Facebook
  • Follow on Twitter
  • Follow on Pinterest
  • Follow on BookBub
  • Follow on Amazon
  • Follow on GoodReads

My birthstone is diamond. I have to say I have never bought myself any diamonds but if I did I’d love a pink diamond. Pink is a color I love because it suits me. I wear a lot of pink—pink shirts, pink lipstick, pink handbags, pink shoes etc. Ask any of my friends and they will tell you pink is my favorite color. But when I saw this picture of a pink diamond ring, suddenly I thought perhaps owning some diamonds would not be a bad thing.

Then I learned that pink diamonds are one of the rarest stones in the world. Very few people have ever had the opportunity to even see a pink diamond in person, and even fewer have the opportunity of ever owning a pink diamond in their own diamond jewelry collection. Pink diamonds are mostly mined in the Argyle Mine in Australia. So close but still so far….

One of the most well known pink diamonds in the world today is called Darya-I-Nur. It is one of the biggest diamonds in the world. It has a rose color to it. The exact size of the stone is uncertain because it’s been set in a brooch for over one hundred years. Another popular pink/rose colored diamond is the Conde Pink which was once owned by Louis XIII. The weight of this particular pink diamond totals over 9 carats. You also have the Agra diamond, which is a natural colored light red/pink diamond that was cut down from an original weight of 32 carats but was reduced in size down to 28 carats when it was cut into a cushion shape after a sale in 1990.

Unfortunately, most colored diamonds, including pink diamonds, hold or increase in value. So the likelihood of me ever owning one might just depend on me winning lotto! Never fear, I’ll have my next hero buy one for my heroine. I love being a writer, and fulfilling some of my dreams through my characters.

What is your birthstone, and if you could own any ring in the world, what stone would it be?

Why is it we are so interested in where we came from? Is it just curiosity, or is it a driving need to see if there are skeletons in our closet?

I must admit I was interested. I even sent away for my genealogy results. I don’t know why, as there were no surprises at all…Both my mother and father’s family’s came to NZ from Great Britain

British & Irish 76.1%

French & German 7.8%

Scandinavian 0.5%

Broadly Northwestern European 13.7%

Southern European 2.7% (with <0.1% Japanese)

What I’d be more interested in, is why my ancestors left England all those years ago, and how my family ended up in New Zealand. Why pick NZ? 

On my father’s side, I’m about sixth generation New Zealander. My father’s family came from Wales in the mid 1800’s one of the first settlers. What must their lives have been like to make them risk a dangerous and arduous trip on a ship to a country they knew nothing about? Mid 1800’s they were still carving out farms from the bush and the Maori wars were still ongoing.

My mother’s side is much newer to NZ. Both of her parents arrived in NZ as 5 year-olds around 1910. Their parents probably had a much better idea of what was awaiting them here in NZ. My grandfather was from England and my grandmother was from Scotland. 

I wish I knew the history of why they immigrated. But finding that information has not been easy. My sister, Lisa, is tracing the family tree. From seeing what was going on in their lives around the time they left the United Kingdom we might be able to surmise why. I guess I’ll just have to be patient.

I envy this generation. We will be able to keep online records, including photo’s, video etc of our lives for future generations to view.  

If you were making a video for the future, what messages would you give and what would you want to show about today’s world?

A study completed in Switzerland has learned that the male body part most women stare at the longest is…..no, get your mind out of the gutter—it’s a man’s stomach. I know, I would have thought biceps, pecs, or something sweet like their eyes.

Doctors from Geneva University Hospitals asked male and female volunteers to look at 120 photographs of people in swimsuits – and to rate those of the opposite sex for sexual desire.

The research found that both sexes spent longer looking at the body than at the face.

But women looked at the abdomens of the men more extensively than the chest or pectoral region, which was in turn viewed more than the genital area. Females also homed in on the abdomen longer and more frequently than males.

You can probably guess what area the men stared at the most—yip, the chest area.

Scientists are suggesting that the male abdomen may be a visible marker of testosterone levels. They think that large amounts of belly fat may be linked to low levels of the hormone, which may be associated with a reduced sex drive.

Do you think we know that when we check out a hot guy?

I must admit that a man’s smile, especially if he has nice, kind eyes is a turn on for me, but I’m sure I’d do a double take if Mr. Ripped and Muscled cruised by. 

Sigh, that’s why I’m very partial to Philip Winchester. He has a kill me smile coupled with a hot body.

I have to say it’s very rare for us to mix with shirtless men every day of the week, so I’m suspecting it’s the eyes or smile that we are attracted to most of the time. What attracts you to a man? Who is your latest hottie?